2020 Business Resolutions Part 3: Better Online Security

Kristi ShmyrUncategorized

Online Security

As we’ve talked about in many of our past blog posts, security isn’t just a matter of keeping your own data out of the hands of unscrupulous hackers; you also need to be careful of your client data. In fact, if you don’t take better care of your online security in 2020, you could be facing $100k in fines for each infraction. Which is why our fourth 2020 business resolution is to increase your online security. (You can read about resolution 1, 2 and 3 on our blog.)

Increased Online Security

This is an important and incredibly large issue, so let’s break this down into a few subcategories. After all, it’s almost the end of January, and you are probably looking for several more resolutions to tackle, right?

Ignore suspicious links

If you have any doubt about a link’s authenticity, whether it be sent in an email or on a webpage, don’t click it. If you didn’t expect an email from a colleague or friend with a link, be suspicious. If an email asks you to click through to cancel an order you never made, or change your password, be suspicious. And if you see a link to hilarious cat videos – and this is the hardest one to ignore – be suspicious.

If you are worried the email is legitimate, there is always another way to access your account (if it’s a company you use). Rarely – if ever – is a link the only option. You can read more about identifying spam emails with potentially malicious links here.

Don’t use public Wi-Fi

Unsecured Wi-Fi is convenient when you don’t want to use up your data. But the key word we really need you to pay attention to is unsecured. The very thing that makes it easy to use makes it dangerous. It’s simple for anyone else using that network to access your data. Don’t risk it – pay the price for a good data plan that keeps you covered.

Stop recycling passwords

Again, we get it. It’s easier to remember one password than to remember one for every single place you log on to. But here’s the thing – it’s also easier for someone trying to steal your data. If your password has ever been involved in a data breach – and chances are, it has – you are making it very easy for someone to access every other account you have. And don’t think changing one character is enough. Make strong, complicated passwords, unique to every account. Use a password manager if you don’t feel like making this your full-time job. 

Update immediately

One of life’s big annoyances is when you get that notification on your phone or your computer, asking you to update. Who has time for that? There are cat videos to watch, and probably business to do (we assume. We’re pretty busy with cat videos). But it is extremely important. Malware often spreads because people fail to do this simple task. And if you’ve ever been frustrated that your operating system doesn’t do enough to protect you from online threats, ask yourself if you’ve been doing your updates. Because guess what? That’s how they protect you.

Online security is incredibly important, and it will continue to be in 2020. That’s why we suggest you make one of your business resolutions this year about increasing your online security.